Why I hate charity art auctions

Contemporary and Old Art Reviews

Why I hate charity art auctions

Postby jasperjoffe » Mon Sep 23, 2013 8:10 pm

1.. If people want to donate to charity why do they have to do so by buying art? The artists are usually broke and probably should be getting the charity ..or a job... rather than giving away their work
2... There is one room for nobody artists who usually give a decent piece and one room for famous artists who give some scrappy drawing or a print.
3... The openings are lavish affairs for trashy rich people who are always getting free drinks and snacks. Give the Canapes to charity instead.
4... The whole thing is a stupid ugly reflection of the stupid ugly artworld
5.. there are too many.
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Re: Why I hate charity art auctions

Postby jasperjoffe » Mon Sep 23, 2013 8:25 pm

6. They exploit desperate artists desparate need for attention and networking
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Re: Why I hate charity art auctions

Postby lill » Wed Sep 25, 2013 3:43 pm

Many charities are happy for artists to take a percentage of the charity art auction sales price of their artwork, as the artist would with a gallery. One can set a reserve price and determine the maximum amount the artist has to receive in the event of sale. Inline with most galleries this can be set at 50% of what ones work normally retails at. Art Auctions normally command more for a painting than would other wise happen, so the charity gets the 'gallery' 50% and anything over and above the normal asking price. In this way one can submit ones best artwork and create a much better auction, whilst not leaving the artist working 'for free'. After all, many people working for the charity sector are paid.

eg: If a painting you offer up for auction would normally sell for about £2000, then set the reserve at price at £2000, of which your commission at 50%. If the work sells at the charity auction for £3000, then you would get your expected 50% of the reserve price @ £1000, and the charity would achieve £2000. You walk away with the same amount you would get through a commercial gallery.

This I have done on several occasions and everyone has been happy. Most charities have a good idea of the upper limit their target audience at auction are willing to spend, and therefore can select work accordingly. They are also willing to ask the purchaser if you can add their details on your mailing list.
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